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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From September 25 to October 9, 2017

    Mercury appears lower and lower above the eastern horizon at dawn, about 20 minutes before sunrise. The tiny planet vanishes in the Sun’s glare during the last mornings of September. Mercury passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on October 8 and will gradually emerge in the evening sky in early November.

    Venus is the bright Morning Star, shining above the eastern horizon at the end of the night and at dawn; Venus rises more than 2 hours before the sun. Follow the motion of Mars, as the much fainter Red Planet slowly pulls away from the Sun and climbs toward Venus: on the morning of October 5, the two planets are less than ¼ degree apart, and visible in the same telescopic field of view! The lunar crescent will be near Venus on the mornings of October 17 and 18.

    Mars is slowly emerging from the sun’s glare and climbs toward dazzling Venus in the morning sky: on the morning of October 5, the two planets appear less than ¼ degree apart, and visible in the same telescopic field of view! The lunar crescent will hang just one degree to the left of the Red Planet on the morning of October 17.

    Jupiter is increasingly difficult to pick out, very low in the west-southwest, a few minutes after sunset. The Giant Planet is sinking in the glow of sunset and vanishes in the sun’s glare early in October. Jupiter will pass behind the Sun (conjunction) on October 26, and will gradually reappear at dawn during the second week of November.

    Saturn appears at dusk, some 20 degrees above the south-southwest horizon, and vanishes in the southwest after 9:30 p.m. The crescent moon will hang less than 3 degrees above the Ringed Planet on the evening of September 26.


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    • Botanical Garden
    Pathway to Phytotechnologies - Decontamination
    Photo: Espace pour la vie

    From September 25 to 29, the International Phytotechnologies Conference will be bringing some 300 phytotechnology experts from around the world to Montréal. This flourishing science uses living plants to solve environmental problems. Their low capital cost, high success rates, minimal maintenance requirements and esthetic qualities all make phytotechnologies extremely attractive.

    Montréal boasts leading experts

    Under the aegis of the Institut de recherche en plant biology (IRBV), a plant biology research institute managed jointly by the Université de Montréal and the Montréal Botanical Garden, this international symposium is a tribute to the growing importance of phytotechnologies. It also shows the leadership role played by the experts at the IRBV and the Montréal Botanical Garden in the field of phytoremediation.

    A showcase for plants’ powers at the Botanical Garden

    In fact, the Montréal Botanical Garden is currently the site of an exceptional project to demonstrate plants’ amazing powers. The future Pathway to Phytotechnologies will show visitors how plants are helping to preserve biodiversity at the Botanical Garden by maintaining and restoring existing sites. The different types of phytotechnology will be explained through demonstrations, visitor activities and models, to inspire visitors and make them aware of plants’ potential.

    The estimated cost of the Pathway to Phytotechnologies is $14.5 million. The city of Montréal will invest one dollar in the Pathway for every dollar raised by the Montréal Space for Life Foundation. To date the Foundation has raised over $1.1 million, and the fundraising campaign is continuing!


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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From October 9 to 23, 2017

    Mercury is too close to the Sun and is not currently observable. The tiny planet passed behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on October 8. It will gradually reappear in the evening sky in early November.

    Venus is the bright Morning Star, shining above the eastern horizon at the very end of the night and at dawn. Venus is slowly sinking back toward the Sun, and now rises less than 2 hours before our daytime star. The lunar crescent will be near Venus on the mornings of October 17 and 18.

    Mars is slowly pulling away from the sun’s glare and now rises 2 ½ hours before our star. You’ll find the Red Planet at the end of the night and at dawn, a few degrees above dazzling Venus in the eastern sky. The lunar crescent will hang just one degree to the left of Mars on the morning of October 17.

    Jupiter vanishes in the sun’s glare at sunset. The Giant Planet will pass behind the Sun (conjunction) on October 26, and will gradually reappear at dawn during the second week of November.

    Saturn appears at dusk, less than 20 degrees above the south-southwest horizon, and vanishes in the southwest before 9:00 p.m. The crescent moon passes near the Ringed Planet on the evenings of October 23 and 24.


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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From October 23 to November 6, 2017

    Mercury passed behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on October 8. Still immersed in the sun’s glare, the tiny planet gradually reappears in the evening sky during the first days of November: using binoculars, search for it by scanning the south-western horizon, 15 minutes after sunset.

    Venus is the bright Morning Star, shining above the east-southeast horizon at the very end of the night and at dawn. Venus is slowly sinking back toward the Sun, and now rises less than 2 hours before our daytime star. The lunar crescent will hang 4 degree to the left of Venus on the morning of November 17.

    Mars is slowly pulling away from the sun’s glare and now rises 3 hours before our star. You’ll find the Red Planet at the end of the night and at dawn, about 15 degrees above dazzling Venus in the east-southeast. The lunar crescent will appear near Mars on the mornings of November 14 and 15.

    Jupiter is too close to the Sun and is not currently observable. The Giant Planet passes behind our star (conjunction) on October 26, and will gradually reappear at dawn during the second week of November: look for it in the east-southeast, below and slightly to the left of Venus, 20 minutes before sunrise.

    Saturn appears at dusk, about 15 degrees above the southwest horizon, and sets after 8:00 p.m. The crescent moon passes near the Ringed Planet on the evenings of October 23 and 24.


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  • 10/23/17--14:00: Space Next / EXO
  • English

    Start date

    Tuesday, November 21, 2017 (All day)

    Summary

    STARTING NOVEMBER 21 - A new double feature at the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium.

    Description

    Double feature Space Next Space Next takes audiences off to new horizons and invites them to imagine life spreading elsewhere in the solar system and the cosmos. Production: Afterglow Studios, Inc. Fact sheet EXO Are we alone in the Universe? As thousands of planets are being detected outside our solar system, can the discovery of life elsewhere be far off? Scientists are delving into this quest for knowledge of our origins, and the possible impact of finding extraterrestrial life. The show is preceded by a presentation on tonight’s sky. Produced by Montréal Space for Life 7 years old and over.  Fact sheet

    Event ID

    746 919

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    HERE'S TO LIFE!

    End date

    Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 8:00 PM

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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From November 6 to 20, 2017

    Mercury, still immersed in the sun’s glare, is visible with difficulty in the evening sky: using binoculars, search for the tiny planet by scanning the south-western horizon, 20 minutes after sunset.

    Venus is the bright Morning Star, shining at dawn above the east-southeast horizon. Venus is sinking back toward the Sun, and now rises only about 75 minutes before our daytime star. Jupiter, now just returning to the morning sky, rapidly rises toward Venus: the two brightest planets have a spectacularly close encounter on the morning of November 13, when they’ll be less than a third of a degree apart. The lunar crescent will hang 4 degree to the left of Venus on the morning of November 17, with Jupiter just a few degrees above them.

    Mars is slowly pulling away from the sun’s glare and now rises more than 3 hours before our star. You’ll find the Red Planet in the east-southeast at the end of the night and at dawn. The lunar crescent will appear near Mars on the mornings of November 14 and 15.

    Jupiter passed behind the Sun (conjunction) on October 26, and gradually reappears at dawn during the second week of November: look for the Giant Planet low in the east-southeast, below and slightly to the left of Venus, 20 minutes before sunrise. Over the following mornings, Jupiter rapidly rises toward Venus: the two brightest planets have a spectacularly close encounter on the morning of November 13, when they’ll be less than a third of a degree apart. The lunar crescent will hang 4 degree to the left of Venus on the morning of November 17, a few degrees below Jupiter.

    Saturn appears at dusk, a dozen degrees above the southwest horizon, and sets around 6:30 p.m. The crescent moon hangs less than 3 degrees from the Ringed Planet on the evening of November 20.


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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From November 20 to December 4, 2017

    Mercury remains immersed in the sun’s glare, and is visible with difficulty at dusk: using binoculars, search for the tiny planet by scanning the south-western horizon, 20 minutes after sunset. Mercury comes within 3 degrees of Saturn during the evenings of late-November and early-December.

    Venus is the bright Morning Star, shining low above the east-southeast horizon 30 minutes before sunrise. Venus is sinking back toward the Sun, and it appears lower and lower in the glow of dawn: We’ll lose sight of it around mid-December.

    Mars is slowly pulling away from the sun’s glare and now rises more than 3 ½ hours before our star. You’ll find Mars in the southeast at the end of the night and at dawn. Keep an eye on the Red Planet as it approaches bright bluish star Spica: their respective colour makes a striking contrast. The star and planet come within about 3 degrees of each other around November 30. The lunar crescent will hang less than 5 degrees from Mars on the morning of December 13.

    Jupiter is pulling away from the Sun and rapidly gains height in the morning sky: the bright planet rises a couple hours before the Sun, and shines at dawn in the east-southeast. The lunar crescent will hang less than 4 degrees from Jupiter on the morning of December 14.

    Saturn appears at dusk, barely 5 degrees above the southwest horizon, where it sets around 5:30 p.m. Use binoculars to help you spot the Ringed Planet in the glow of sunset. The crescent moon hangs less than 3 degrees from the Ringed Planet on the evening of November 20. Keep an eye on planet Mercury, which comes within 3 degrees of Saturn during the evenings of late-November and early-December.


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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From December 4 to 18, 2017

    Mercury becomes fainter and is now too close to the Sun: the tiny planet is presently unobservable. Mercury passes between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on December 12, following which it rapidly emerges in the morning sky for a favourable apparition that begins on December 21.

    Venus is ending its stint as the Morning Star: the bright planet is drawing closer to the Sun and vanishes in the glow of approaching sunrise. You may still be able to spot it with binoculars, very low in the east-southeast 20 minutes before sunrise — but we’ll lose sight of it definitely during the second week of December. Venus passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on January 9, and will reappear in the evening sky later that month.

    Mars is slowly pulling away from the sun’s glare and now rises more than 4 hours before our star. You’ll find Mars in the southeast at the end of the night and at dawn. The lunar crescent will hang less than 5 degrees from Mars on the morning of December 13. Notice how bright Jupiter is drawing closer and closer to Mars over the coming weeks.

    Jupiter is pulling away from the Sun and rapidly gains height in the morning sky: the bright planet rises about 3 hours before the Sun, and shines at dawn in the southeast. The lunar crescent will hang less than 4 degrees from Jupiter on the morning of December 14. Notice how bright Jupiter is drawing closer and closer to Mars (to its upper right) over the coming weeks.

    Saturn is now too close to the southwest horizon at sunset, and vanishes in the Sun’s glare. The Ringed Planet passes behind the Sun (conjunction) on December 21, and gradually reappears at dawn during the first week of January.


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    • Botanical Garden

    Congratulations to the outdoor gardens team and horticulturist Mireille Dubuc of the Garden of Innovations, for taking 2nd place in the “Over 100,000 visitors” category of the All-America Selections Landscape Design Challenge.

    The magnificent layout of the winning border clearly won the judges’ hearts! 


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    • Botanical Garden

    The American Orchid Society has just presented the team led by Marie-Claude Limoges of the Horticulture and Collections Division with three certificates won in January, August and September 2017, as part of the Society’s monthly awards, for their magnificent orchid specimens.

    Congratulations on a great hat trick!


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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From December 18, 2017, to January 1, 2018

    Mercury passed between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on December 12. After December 21, it rapidly emerges at dawn for a favourable morning apparition. Using binoculars, look for the tiny planet by scanning the southeast horizon, 45 minutes before sunrise; Mercury gradually becomes brighter over the coming weeks.

    Venus is too close to the Sun and is not currently visible. Venus passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on January 9, and will reappear in the evening sky later that month.

    Mars now rises in the east-southeast, about 4 ½ hours before the Sun. At dawn, the Red Planet shines in the south-southeast, to the upper right of bright Jupiter. Notice how bright Jupiter is drawing closer and closer to Mars over the coming weeks: the two planets will have a close encounter on January 6 and 7.On the morning of January 11, the lunar crescent will hang less than 4 degrees from Mars and Jupiter — a beautiful sight at dawn!

    Jupiter rises about 4 hours before the Sun in the east-southeast. At dawn the bright planet shines in the south-southeast, with fainter Mars to its upper right. Notice how Jupiter is drawing closer and closer to Mars over the coming weeks: the two planets will have a close encounter on January 6 and 7.On the morning of January 11, the lunar crescent will hang less than 4 degrees from Mars and Jupiter — a beautiful sight at dawn!

    Saturn is too close to the Sun and is not currently visible. The Ringed Planet passes behind the Sun (conjunction) on December 21, and gradually reappears at dawn during the first week of January.


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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From January 1 to 15, 2018

    Mercury is presently visible at dawn. The tiny planet is at greatest elongation on January 1, 23 degrees west (to the right) of the Sun, but that gap gradually closes afterwards. Using binoculars, look for the tiny planet by scanning the southeast horizon, 40 minutes before sunrise. Saturn gradually emerges from the horizon during that period and passes just ¾ degree above Mercury on the morning of January 13. The thin crescent moon forms a compact triangle with Mercury and Saturn on the morning of January 15.

    Venus is too close to the Sun and is not currently visible. Venus passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on January 9, and will not reappear in the evening sky until the very end of the month.

    Mars now rises in the east-southeast, about 4 ½ hours before the Sun. At the crack of dawn, the Red Planet shines in the south-southeast, near bright Jupiter. Notice how the gap between the two planets is changing on a daily basis: they have a close encounter on January 6 and 7— just over ¼ degree apart! On the morning of January 11, the lunar crescent hangs less than 4 degrees from Mars and Jupiter — a beautiful sight at dawn!

    Jupiter rises about 4 ½ hours before the Sun in the east-southeast. At dawn the bright planet shines in the south-southeast, with fainter Mars nearby. Notice how the gap between the two planets is changing on a daily basis: they have a close encounter on January 6 and 7— just over ¼ degree apart! On the morning of January 11, the lunar crescent hangs less than 4 degrees from Mars and Jupiter — a beautiful sight at dawn!

    Saturn passed behind the Sun (conjunction) on December 21, and gradually reappears at dawn during the first week of January. Search for the Ringed Planet 40 minutes before sunrise: using binoculars, scan the brightening sky just above the southeast horizon. Saturn gains a bit of elevation every morning and passes just ¾ degree above Mercury on the morning of January 13. The thin crescent moon forms a compact triangle with Mercury and Saturn on the morning of January 15.


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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From January 15 to 29, 2018

    Mercury is visible with difficulty at dawn until about January 22. Using binoculars, search for the tiny planet very low on the southeast horizon, 30 minutes before sunrise. But Mercury is drawing closer to the Sun and appears lower every passing day; it vanishes completely in the Sun’s glare during the last week of January. Mercury passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on February 17, and will reappear in the evening sky in early March.

    Venus is too close to the Sun and is not currently visible. Venus passed behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on January 9, but will not reappear in the evening sky until the very end of the month.

    Mars rises in the east-southeast shortly before 3 a.m., and can be found in the south-southeast at dawn. The Red Planet shines a few degrees to the left of bright Jupiter, but the gap between them is increasing on a daily basis. On the morning of February 8, the lunar crescent appears between Mars and Jupiter, completing a large, flattened triangle with the two planets. The next morning, February 9, the crescent hangs 4 degrees to the left of Mars.

    Jupiter rises in the east-southeast around 2 a.m. and shines in the south-southeast at dawn. The Red Planet shines a few degrees to its left, but the gap between them is increasing from day to day. On the morning of February 7, the last quarter Moon hangs 7 degrees to the upper right of Jupiter. The next morning, February 8, the lunar crescent appears between Mars and Jupiter, completing a large, flattened triangle with the two planets.

    Saturn is gradually pulling away from the Sun’s glare and appears at dawn above the southeast horizon 45 minutes before sunrise. At first, binoculars might help you locate the Ringed Planet in the glow of dawn; but Saturn gains a bit of elevation every morning and become visible against an increasingly darker sky by the end of January. The thin crescent moon passes less than 2 degrees above Saturn on the morning of February 11.


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  • 01/23/18--09:00: Seedy Weekend
  • English

    Start date

    Friday, February 9, 2018 (All day)

    ID Location

    ID space

    Location

    Summary

    FEBRUARY 9 TO 11 - Come discover the rich variety of heirloom plants from Quebec and meet producers of organic seeds.

    Description

    Montréal Space for Life is proud to present the 18th edition of the Seedy Weekend at the Botanical Garden, organized by Alternatives. All weekend long, beginning on February 9, you can browse through the offerings of some twenty exhibitors from the local agri-food industry and get a head start on planning your gardening season. Pick up all sorts of organic flower, herb, medicinal plant and unusual and heritage vegetable seeds. Meet Quebec growers and get some tips at hands-on workshops, attend lectures on urban agriculture and enjoy seed-swapping opportunities. Bring your reusable bags and cup! Cash payments only. All Seedy Weekend activities are free. You will still need to pay admission to the Botanical Garden greenhouses, however, if you wish to visit them. Exhibitors Jardins La Brouette Les Jardins de l’écoumène Earth Alive Clean Technologies Inc. Homegrown Mushrooms Semences du Portage Tourne-Sol Co-operative Farm Vert Demain Lapinambourg Le potager ornemental de Catherine Jardin des vie-la-joie Mycoflor inc. La société des plantes Les semences du batteux Terre Promise Jardins de la Gaillarde Prendre Racine Semences Le Noyau Greta’s Organic Gardens Semis urbains USC Canada De Notre Jardin  

    Event ID

    799 728

    Topic

    Type

    End date

    Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 7:00 PM

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    • Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From January 29 to February 12, 2018

    Mercury is now too close to the sun and is not visible currently. From our point of view, the tiny planet passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on February 17, and will reappear in the evening sky in early March.

    Venus passed behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on January 9, and gradually reappears at dusk during the first evenings in February. Using binoculars, scan the skies just above the west-southwest horizon looking for the bright Evening Star, 10 to 15 minutes after sunset. Venus is slowly pulling away from the Sun’s glare and will become easier to locate over the coming weeks.

    Mars rises in the east-southeast around 3 a.m., and can be found in the south-southeast at dawn. The Red Planet shines a few degrees to the left of bright Jupiter, but the gap between them is increasing day by day. On the morning of February 8, the lunar crescent appears between Mars and Jupiter, completing a large, flattened triangle with the two planets. The next morning, February 9, the crescent hangs 4 degrees to the left of Mars.

    Jupiter appears above the east-southeast horizon around 2 a.m. and culminates at dawn 27 degrees high in the south. The Red Planet shines a few degrees to its left, but the gap between them is increasing from day to day. On the morning of February 7, the last quarter Moon hangs 7 degrees to the upper right of Jupiter. The next morning, February 8, the lunar crescent appears between Mars and Jupiter, completing a large, flattened triangle with the two planets.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 5:30 a.m., and gains some height during dawn until it becomes lost in the brightening glow of approaching sunrise. The thin crescent moon passes less than 2 degrees above Saturn on the morning of February 11.


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  • 01/29/18--10:00: Butterflies Go Free
  • English

    Start date

    Thursday, February 22, 2018 (All day)

    ID Location

    Summary

    FEBRUARY 22 TO APRIL 29 - In the Main Exhibition Greenhouse, hundreds of colourful butterflies flit joyously about amidst the lush greenery.

    Description

    Nature Haven Enjoy a natural refuge where you can discover butterflies’ habitat and learn how to create your own beautiful, inviting butterfly garden. As you step inside the Reception Centre at the Jardin botanique, you’ll be greeted by a kinetic sculpture by artist Andrea Williamson, a piece bridging human activities and the well-being and vitality of the other species that share our planet. A chair is covered with tiny motorized butterflies whose wings are programmed to flap in correlation with the city’s monitored air pollution levels. The healthier the air, the more active the butterflies. Don’t miss it! Once you reach the Main Exhibition Greenhouse, you’re sure to be dazzled by the thousands of colourful, shimmering butterflies flitting about. The 21st edition of Butterflies Go Free is spotlighting butterflies’ relationship with their habitat. Join the Insectarium’s science educators and learn how to create inviting surroundings for butterflies and recreate the magic of Butterflies Go Free in your own garden. It’s a great way to better share our habitat with local butterflies and to “better dwell on our planet,” together! Fact sheets The butterflies of Butterflies Go Free(PDF - 4.82 Mb - 98 pages)  

    Event ID

    802 938

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    HERE'S TO LIFE!

    End date

    Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 8:00 PM

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  • 01/30/18--09:00: The Great Gardening Weekend
  • English

    Start date

    Friday, May 25, 2018 - 9:00 AM

    ID Location

    Summary

    MAY 25 TO 27 - Gardening is an activity that brings people together in a moment perfect for sharing knowledge and experience with loved ones.

    Description

    A pollinator garden Dreaming of your own colourful garden filled with insects flitting from bloom to bloom? Come to the Great Gardening Weekend, where you can learn about and buy plants to attract and feed them. On the program: some one hundred exhibitors, lectures and tips to help you fulfill your wildest gardening dreams.

    Event ID

    799 732

    Thematics

    The Great Gardening Weekend

    End date

    Saturday, May 26, 2018 - 8:00 PM

    0 0

    English

    Start date

    Tuesday, January 2, 2018 (All day)

    ID Location

    Summary

    Cross-country skiing at the Montréal Botanical Garden. A fun way to make the most of winter in the city!

    Description

    A fun way to make the most of winter in the city! The Montréal Botanical Garden invites cross-country skiers to enjoy your favourite sport on its three kilometres of groomed cross-country ski trails, naturally! From sunrise to sunset, you can follow the snowy trails that wend through the Arboretum. If you’d like a longer route, the trails connect with the ones in Maisonneuve Park. Great news: access to the outdoor gardens is free all season long! So come rediscover the Botanical Garden in its winter splendours, while enjoying some active outdoor fun! A few rules and some practical information: To protect the plants resting beneath the snow, please remain on the trails at all times. Snowshoeing is strictly prohibited anywhere in the Garden, as are ball sports.   There are no ski rentals at the Garden or at Maisonneuve Park; in addition, none of the pavilions are staffed.   For snow conditions, consult the city of Montréal website – click on the Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie borough and go to the cross-country ski conditions page. The Botanical Garden is closed on Mondays until May 14, 2018, except March 5 and April 2. There is a charge for parking.

    Event ID

    801 538

    Topic

    End date

    Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 8:00 PM

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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From February 12 to 26, 2018

    Mercury is too close to the sun and is not visible currently. From our point of view, the tiny planet passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on February 17. It will reappear in the evening sky in early March.

    Venus gradually reappears at dusk, 15 to 20 minutes after sunset, very low in the west-southwest; the bright Evening Star sets shortly thereafter. Binoculars may be of aid at first, but over the coming weeks Venus will become easier to locate with the naked eye as it slowly pulls away from the Sun’s glare. On the evening of February 15, try to catch the thin crescent moon, just 2 degrees to the upper left of Venus.

    Mars rises in the southeast around 3 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. The Red Planet currently shines between bright Jupiter to its right, and Saturn to its left. On the morning of March 10, the crescent moon appears between Mars and Saturn, completing a large, flattened triangle with the two planets.

    Jupiter appears above the east-southeast horizon around 1 a.m. and culminates 27 degrees high in the south at the first light of dawn. On the morning of March 7, the waning gibbous Moon hangs less than 3 ½ degrees above bright Jupiter.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 4:30 a.m., and gains some height during dawn until it becomes lost in the brightening glow of approaching sunrise. On the morning of March 10, the crescent moon appears between Mars and Saturn, drawing a wide, flattened triangle with the two planets. The next day, March 11, the lunar crescent shines 4 degrees to the left of the Ringed Planet.


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  • 02/19/18--11:00: Gardens of Light
  • English

    Start date

    Friday, September 8, 2017 - 9:00 AM

    ID Location

    Summary

    FROM SEPTEMBER 7 TO OCTOBER 31 - Montréal Space for Life is presenting the 7th edition of Gardens of Light, a remarkable event illuminating the Chinese Garden, the Japanese Garden and the First Nations Garden.

    Description

      Tips for a successful visit Natural HarmonyThis autumn event sets three cultural gardens at the Jardin botanique all aglow. The Chinese Garden displays its traditional lanterns and shares a fabulous fishing tale with visitors, the Japanese Garden leads visitors along a meditative illuminated path inspired by the seasons, and the First Nations Garden features an intense multimedia experience that lets visitors feel the beating heart of the Cycle of Life.   Tips for a successful visit To avoid the line-ups, buy your tickets online. Plan to arrive in the late afternoon to admire the blooms and fall colours and grab a bite at our restaurant or café. Come early in the week or after 8 p.m. on other evenings (you can stay up to one hour after the ticket counter closes). Take public transit (Pie-IX metro station; 185 and 139 buses). It’s much easier to use a baby carrier than a stroller on the path. Remember that tripods are not allowed on the Gardens of Light path. Enjoy!  

    Event ID

    744 425

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    Nature dwells within us

    End date

    Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 8:00 PM

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