Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | (Page 2) | 3 | 4 | newer

    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From February 26 to March 12, 2018

    Mercury passed behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on February 17 and now reappears in the early evening sky: look for the tiny planet very low above the western horizon, near dazzling Venus, 30 minutes after sunset. From March 2 to 4, Mercury hangs about one degree to the right of the Evening Star. On March 18, at dusk, the thin crescent moon joins Venus and Mercury, drawing a line with the two planets. Note that Mercury is brightest at the beginning of this apparition, and gradually becomes fainter from day to day.

    Venus is now visible at dusk, very low in the west, 20 minutes after sunset; the bright Evening Star sets shortly thereafter. The visibility of Venus will keep improving as it slowly pulls away from the Sun’s glare over the coming weeks. Let Venus guide you to fainter Mercury, which will stay within a few degrees of Venus until the third week in March:from March 2 to 4, the tiny planet hangs just over one degree to the right of the Evening Star. On March 18, at dusk, the thin crescent moon joins Venus and Mercury, drawing a line with the two planets.

    Mars rises in the southeast around 2:30 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. The Red Planet currently shines between bright Jupiter to its right, and Saturn to its left. On the morning of March 10, the crescent moon appears between Mars and Saturn, completing a large, flattened triangle with the two planets.

    Jupiter appears above the east-southeast horizon around midnight and culminates 27 degrees high in the south before dawn. On the morning of March 7, the waning gibbous Moon hangs less than 3 ½ degrees above bright Jupiter.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 3:30 a.m., and gains some height during dawn until it becomes lost in the brightening glow of approaching sunrise. On the morning of March 10, the crescent moon appears between Mars and Saturn, drawing a wide, flattened triangle with the two planets. The next day, March 11, the lunar crescent shines 4 degrees to the left of the Ringed Planet.


    0 0

    • Space for Life
    EPLV Ice Canoe Team

    On February 4, the Space for Life ice canoeing team was presented with the HMCS Montcalm paddling award. That prize recognizes a team that has stood out through its tenacity, its fighting spirit, its teamwork and its community support, values that are shared by the Royal Canadian Navy.

    From left to right in the photo: Lieutenant Michael Savoie of HCMS Montcalm; Stéphane Morin, helmsman; Stéphane Dumas, starboard bow; Emiko Wong, aft port; Simon Trudel-Perreault, port bow; Isabelle Girard, aft starboard; and Lieutenant and vice-president of the organizing committee for the Carnaval canoeing race, Eric Bolduc.


    0 0

    English

    Start date

    Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 9:30 AM

    Summary

    STARTING FEBRUARY 27 - A new double feature for ages 4 to 8

    Description

    Double feature The Blind Man with Starry Eyes An ambitious tyrant asks a wise old man in his kingdom how he can become even more powerful. Although he insists, he can only elicit one answer: “Look at the sky and count the stars.” When he realizes the old man will not give him more clues, the tyrant follows his advice and starts counting the stars in the sky. Gradually, they forge a relationship that changes the tyrant’s quest for domination into a quest for knowledge. Animation film Length: 23 minutes Offered for ages 4 to 8 Fact sheet   Aboard the SSE-4801 Multimedia show produced by the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium (Canada) Why is the sky blue? Where do stars hide during the day? Are there only stars and the Moon in the sky? To find out, hop on board SSE-4801 to discover what hides in the outer reaches of our celestial neighbourhood: the Solar System. Guided by our spirited host, you'll soar in orbit for an incredible journey, somewhere between the Sun and Neptune; exploring the eight planets, new moons, and an asteroid field. You'll also meet a cute and mysterious little comet. Ready for take-off? Let the adventure begin! Length: 40 minutes Directors: Isabelle Pruneau-Brunet et Simon A. Bélanger Original score: Les Petites Tounes Offered for ages 4 to 8 Fact sheet   Special March Break Hours (3 to 11 March) 9:30 and 10:00 a.m. (Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday) Special schedule Easter Monday (2 April) Unavailable

    Event ID

    799 176

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    Nature dwells within us

    End date

    Thursday, June 20, 2019 - 8:00 PM

    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From March 12 to 26, 2018

    Mercury is visible in the early evening sky until about March 21: look for the tiny planet above the western horizon, less than 5 degrees from dazzling Venus, 45 minutes after sunset. On March 18, at dusk, the thin crescent moon joins Venus and Mercury, drawing a line with the two planets. Note that Mercury is fairly bright at the beginning of this period, but its brightness falls rapidly after March 20: we lose sight of it in the glow of sunset in the following days.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star visible in the west at dusk, 30 minutes after sunset; Venus now sets one and a half hour after the sun. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun, improving its visibility at nightfall. Until March 21, let Venus guide you to fainter Mercury, which remains within 5 degrees to its upper right. On March 18, at dusk, the thin crescent moon joins Venus and Mercury, drawing a line with the two planets.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 3:30 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. Keep an eye on the Red Planet as it is steadily approaches Saturn, a few degrees to its left; on the morning of April 2, Mars will pass a little more than one degree below the Ringed Planet. On the morning of April 7, the waning gibbous moon meets Saturn and Mars, drawing a short line with the two planets.

    Jupiter appears above the east-southeast horizon around midnight and culminates 27 degrees high in the south around 4:30 a.m. On the morning of April 3, the waning gibbous Moon hangs 6 degrees above bright Jupiter.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 4:00 a.m., and gains some height during dawn until it becomes lost in the brightening glow of approaching sunrise. Keep an eye on the Red Planet, a few degrees to its right, as it is steadily approaches Saturn; on the morning of April 2, Mars will pass a little more than one degree below the Ringed Planet. On the morning of April 7, the waning gibbous moon meets Saturn and Mars, drawing a short line with the two planets.


    0 0
  • 03/13/18--07:00: Space Next / EXO
  • English

    Start date

    Tuesday, November 21, 2017 (All day)

    Summary

    A new double feature at the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium.

    Description

    Double feature Space Next Space Next takes audiences off to new horizons and invites them to imagine life spreading elsewhere in the solar system and the cosmos. Production: Afterglow Studios, Inc. Schedule Fact sheet Teaser   EXO Produced by Montréal Space for Life Are we alone in the Universe? As thousands of planets are being detected outside our solar system, can the discovery of life elsewhere be far off? Scientists are delving into this quest for knowledge of our origins, and the possible impact of finding extraterrestrial life. The show is preceded by a presentation on tonight’s sky. 7 years old and over. Schedule Fact sheet Are we alone? Contest

    Event ID

    806 556

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    Nature dwells within us

    End date

    Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 8:00 PM

    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From March 26 to April 9, 2018

    Mercury is presently too close to the sun and is not observable. The tiny planet passes between Earth and the sun (inferior conjunction) on April 1st and will emerge gradually in the morning sky for an unfavourable apparition. We’ll be able to see it with much difficulty very low on the eastern horizon, between 20 and 30 minutes before sunrise, at the end of April and in early May.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, 30 minutes after sunset. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun and now sets more than one and a half hour after our daytime star. On April 17, at dusk, the thin crescent moon appears less than 6 degrees to the lower left of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 3:00 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. Keep an eye on the Red Planet as it is steadily approaches and overtakes Saturn, passing a little more than one degree below the Ringed Planet on the morning of April 2.On the morning of April 7, the waning gibbous moon meets Saturn and Mars, drawing a short line with the two planets.

    Jupiter appears above the east-southeast horizon around 11:30 p.m. and culminates 27 degrees high in the south around 3:30 a.m. During the night of April 2 to 3, the waning gibbous Moon hangs 6 degrees above bright Jupiter.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 3:00 a.m., and gains some height during dawn until it becomes lost in the brightening glow of approaching sunrise. Keep an eye on Mars as it is steadily approaches and overtakes Saturn, passing a little more than one degree below the Ringed Planet on the morning of April 2.On the morning of April 7, the waning gibbous moon meets Saturn and Mars, drawing a short line with the two planets.


    0 0

    English

    Start date

    Saturday, April 7, 2018 (All day)

    Summary

    APRIL 7 AND 8 - A Weekend of Family Activities to Celebrate the 5th Anniversary of the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan

    Description

    On April 7 and 8, come celebrate the 5th anniversary of the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan. Families fascinated by the starry sky, planets and astronomical phenomena are invited to attend the programs for young audiences, The Blind Man with Starry Eyes and Aboard the SSE-4801, the ongoing activities on the theme of astronomy and the simulated exploration of an exoplanet by a remote-controlled probe directed by the Cité des Scienceset de l'Industrie in Paris. SPECIAL PROGRAM  Saturday, April 7FREE ACTIVITIES9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Science presentations every 30 minutes10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Special robotics workshop hosted by Échofab1:45 to 3 p.m.“Expédition Paris–Montréal – Y a-t-il une vie sur la planète Montréal?” Live from Paris, the exploration of exoplanet Kepler-442b (a model 9 metres across) by means of a robotic probe (30 cm x 30 cm) controlled live from Paris.PAID ACTIVITIES ($)11:30 a.m. to noon – Double feature for kids:The Blind Man with Starry Eyes / Aboard SSE-48013:30 to 7 p.m. Double feature: Space Next / EXO Sunday, April 8FREE ACTIVITIES 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Science presentations every 30 minutes10:30 to 11:30 a.m.Autograph sessions by members of Les Petites Tounes, the music group that produced the soundtrack for Aboard SSE-4801PAID ACTIVITIES ($)11:30 a.m. to noon – Double feature for kids:The Blind Man with Starry Eyes / Aboard SSE-48013:30 to 4 p.m. Double feature: Space Next / EXO

    Event ID

    814 864

    Topic

    End date

    Saturday, April 7, 2018 - 8:00 PM

    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Bring the family to celebrate the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan’s 5th anniversary!

    On April 7 and 8, Espace pour la vie invites everyone fascinated by starry skies, planets and astronomical phenomena to bring the family and celebrate the 5th anniversary of the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan.

    A weekend with lots for parents and children!

    Festivities include:

    • continuing presentations on the theme of astronomy,
    • the simulated exploration of an exoplanet by a remote-controlled probe directed from the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie in Paris (April 7),
    • an autograph session by members of Les Petites Tounes (April 8), and
    • two shows for young audiences: The Blind Man with Starry Eyes and Aboard SSE-4801.

    Plenty has happened in the past 5 years!

    The Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan has welcomed 1,447,800 visitors since it opened, including 137,500 children from daycares and school groups. When it comes to presentations, exhibitions, collections and shows for the general public and school groups, the figures speak for themselves:

    • 20 different presentations (general public and school groups, not including shows and activities in the theatres)
    • 17 shows for the general public
      • 8 original productions created by the Planetarium team
      • 5 licensed shows 
      • 3 original shows developed by Quebec creators (Continuum, Vertiges, Kyma)
      • 1 co-production with the La Nef musical company (Mira, The Little Star)
    • 1 permanent exhibition, EXO, and 6 temporary exhibitions for the general public
    • The largest public collection of meteorites in Quebec (with over 300 examples).

    Come celebrate with us – you’ll have an astronomically good time!


    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From April 9 to 23, 2018

    Mercury is presently too close to the sun and is not observable. The tiny planet passed between Earth and the sun (inferior conjunction) on April 1st and will emerge gradually in the morning sky for an unfavourable apparition. We’ll be able to see it with much difficulty very low on the eastern horizon, between 20 and 30 minutes before sunrise, at the end of April and in early May.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as early as 15 minutes after sunset. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun and now sets more than two hours after our daytime star. On April 17, at dusk, the thin crescent moon appears less than 6 degrees to the lower left of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 2:30 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. The Red Planet now shines to the left of Saturn, and the gap between them widens with each passing day. On the morning of May 6, the waning gibbous moon stands less than 2 degrees above Mars.

    Jupiter appears above the east-southeast horizon around 10:30 p.m. and culminates 27 degrees high in the south around 2:30 a.m. During the night of April 29 to 30, the full Moon hangs a few degrees to the right of Jupiter. The following evening, April 30, the waning gibbous Moon shines 5 degrees to the left of Jupiter. Watch them as they rise together above the east-southeast horizon: an impressive sight!

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 2:00 a.m., and gains some height during dawn until it becomes lost in the brightening glow of approaching sunrise. Mars now shines to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. On the mornings of May 4 and 5, the waning gibbous moon hangs a few degrees to the right, and then to the left, of the ringed planet, respectively.


    0 0

    English

    Start date

    Friday, March 30, 2018 - 1:00 PM

    ID Location

    Summary

    Yummy maple taffy at the Jardin botanique restaurant!

    Description

    Yummy maple taffy at the Jardin botanique restaurant! Every Friday, Saturday and Sunday in April, the restaurant will be offering maple taffy on snow from 1 to 4 p.m., for $2.17 plus tax per sample. Also offered on Easter Monday. A taste of spring!

    Event ID

    812 196

    Topic

    End date

    Saturday, April 28, 2018 - 8:00 PM

    0 0
  • 04/17/18--07:00: Cosmic Collisions / EXO
  • English

    Start date

    Tuesday, April 17, 2018 (All day)

    Summary

    STARTING APRIL 17 - A new double feature at the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium.

    Description

    Due to technical problems, we are unable to sell online tickets after May, 1st. However, tickets are available at the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan ticket counter. We appreciate your understanding. Double feature for 7 years old and over Cosmic Collisions A radical change from our peaceful night sky, Cosmic Collisions presents the spectacular result of gravity pulling together planets, stars, and galaxies. These sometimes explosive encounters may have not only ended the age of the dinosaurs and gave birth to new stars,essential for life on Earth. Cosmic Collisions will provide an extraordinary view of the forces – constructive or catastrophic – that continue to shape our Universe. Producer: American Museum of Natural History (United States), in collaboration with the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, GOTO Inc. and the Shanghai Science and Technology Museum. Length: 23 minutes Schedule   EXO Are we alone in the Universe? As thousands of planets are being detected outside our solar system, can the discovery of life elsewhere be far off? Scientists are delving into this quest for knowledge of our origins, and the possible impact of finding extraterrestrial life. The show is preceded by a presentation on tonight’s sky. Produced by Montréal Space for Life  Director: Sébastien Gauthier Length: 40 minutes Schedule Fact sheet Are we alone? Contest

    Event ID

    807 890

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    Nature dwells within us

    End date

    Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 8:00 PM

    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From April 23 to May 7, 2018

    Mercury is presently undergoing an unfavourable morning apparition. The tiny planet is visible with much difficulty very low on the eastern horizon, between 20 and 30 minutes before sunrise. Scan the horizon with binoculars to try and find this little pinprick of light lost in the glow of approaching sunrise. The brightness of Mercury is increasing slightly in early May, which may help in locating it.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken in the minutes after sunset. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun and now sets about two and a half hours after our daytime star. From April 25 to 28, Venus passes between two famous open star clusters: the Pleiades and the Hyades; one hour after sunset, examine the darkening sky around the bright planet with binoculars. On May 17, at dusk, the thin crescent moon hangs less than 6 degrees to the left of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky becomes a deep, dark blue, about one hour after sunset.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 2:00 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. Mars shines a few degrees to the left of Saturn, but the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. On the morning of May 6, the waning gibbous moon stands less than 2 degrees above the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the east-southeast horizon around 9:30 p.m. and culminates 27 degrees high in the south around 1:30 a.m. During the night of April 29 to 30, the full Moon hangs a few degrees to the right of Jupiter. The following evening, April 30, the waning gibbous Moon shines 5 degrees to the left of Jupiter. Watch them as they rise together above the east-southeast horizon: an impressive duo!

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 1:00 a.m. and culminates at dawn about 22 degrees high in the south, just before it vanishes in the encroaching light of day. Mars shines a few degrees to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. On the mornings of May 4 and 5, the waning gibbous moon hangs a few degrees to the right, and then to the left, of the ringed planet, respectively.


    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From May 7 to 21, 2018

    Mercury is presently undergoing an unfavourable morning apparition. The tiny planet is visible with much difficulty very low on the eastern horizon, about 20 minutes before sunrise. Scan the horizon with binoculars to try and find this little pinprick of light lost in the glow of approaching sunrise. The brightness of Mercury increases slightly in May, which may help in locating it. But the gap between Mercury and the sun is shrinking from day to day, and the planet becomes lost in the glare of the sun before the end of the month; Mercury passes behind the sun (superior conjunction) on June 5.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken in the minutes after sunset. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun and now sets more than two and a half hours after our daytime star. On May 17, at dusk, the thin crescent moon hangs less than 6 degrees to the left of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky becomes a deep, dark blue, about one hour after sunset.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 1:30 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. Mars shines more than 15 degrees to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. On the morning of June 3, the waning gibbous moon stands just above the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the southeast horizon during evening twilight, culminates 28 degrees high in the south around 12:30 a.m., and vanishes in the west-southwest at dawn. The waxing gibbous Moon shines a few degrees to the left of Jupiter on the evening of May 27.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around midnight, culminates at the crack of dawn about 22 degrees high in the south, and then vanishes as daylight overwhelms it. Mars shines more than 15 degrees to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. During the night of May 31 to June 1, the waning gibbous moon hangs just to the left of the ringed planet.


    0 0

    • Jardin botanique
    Sheep in residence at the Jardin botanique!
    Photo: Coralie Zicat-Cloutier

    Ten sheep have a new temporary home at the Jardin botanique. Visitors can watch the five ewes and their lambs at work between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m., until July 2, near the Leslie Hancock Garden.

    Day to day

    Every morning, a shepherd will take the sheep to their “pasture” for the day, marked off with a flexible, mobile fence. In the evening, they’ll be led back to their temporary, mobile sheep pen.

    Sunday talks

    Visitors are invited to “Matinées bergères,” a series of fun, informative talks (in French) about sheep, eco-grazing and invasive plants.

    A joint project that fits with our mission

    The Jardin botanique is collaborating with an NPO called the Laboratoire d’agriculture urbaine (AU/LAB) on the “Biquette à Montréal” project. The mobile sheep flock, tended by a shepherdess and volunteer citizen-shepherds, is an eco-grazing experiment with a flock of sheep. The initiative will be combined with research on controlling invasive plants at the Jardin botanique. It’s innovative, in keeping with best practices for maintaining urban green spaces, and contributes to biodiversity.

    The sheep have already been “mowing” a number of parks in the Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie borough. In fact they will be moving to Pélican park on July 2.


    0 0

    • Space for Life
    EPLV Ice Canoe Team

    On February 4, the Space for Life ice canoeing team was presented with the HMCS Montcalm paddling award. That prize recognizes a team that has stood out through its tenacity, its fighting spirit, its teamwork and its community support, values that are shared by the Royal Canadian Navy.

    From left to right in the photo: Lieutenant Michael Savoie of HCMS Montcalm; Stéphane Morin, helmsman; Stéphane Dumas, starboard bow; Emiko Wong, aft port; Simon Trudel-Perreault, port bow; Isabelle Girard, aft starboard; and Lieutenant and vice-president of the organizing committee for the Carnaval canoeing race, Eric Bolduc.


    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From May 21 to June 4, 2018

    Mercury is approaching the sun and becomes lost in the glare of the sun before the end of May. The tiny planet passes behind the sun (superior conjunction) on June 5, and will emerge for an evening apparition during the second half of June.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken in the minutes after sunset. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun and now sets more than two and a half hours after our daytime star. On June 15, at dusk, the thin crescent moon hangs 7 degrees below Venus, much closer to the horizon. On the evening of June 16, the lunar crescent stands 7 degrees to the left of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky becomes a deep, dark blue, about one hour after sunset.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 1 a.m., and climbs above the south-southeast horizon at dawn. The Red Planet shines more than 25 degrees to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. On the morning of June 3, the waning gibbous moon stands just above the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the southeast horizon during evening twilight, culminates 28 degrees high in the south around 11:30 p.m., and vanishes in the west-southwest at dawn. The waxing gibbous Moon shines a few degrees to the left of Jupiter on the evening of May 27.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 11 p.m., culminates around 3 a.m. about 22 degrees high in the south, and then vanishes at dawn as brightening daylight overwhelms it. Mars shines more than 25 degrees to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. During the night of May 31 to June 1, the waning gibbous moon hangs just to the left of the ringed planet.


    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    New Director of the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan honoured

    Olivier Hernandez, who recently took the helm at the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan, last night received the Université de Montréal Rector’s Award in the “Inspiration” category. Before taking up his new post, Mr. Hernandez was a Lecturer in the Physics Department of the Faculty of Arts and Science at the Université de Montréal, as well as Director of Operations at the Mont-Mégantic Observatory and Co-ordinator of the Institut de recherche sur les exoplanètes. With this prestigious award, the University recognized the personal qualities and professional competence of an exemplary colleague. Mr. Hernandez will certainly put these valuable skills to use when working with his new team at Espace pour la vie!


    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From June 4 to 18, 2018

    Mercury passes behind the sun (superior conjunction) on June 5; it is not currently observable, being overwhelmed by the glare of our daytime star. The tiny planet gradually emerges in the evening sky during the second half of June.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken in the minutes after sunset. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun and sets more than two and a half hours after our daytime star. On June 15, at dusk, the thin crescent moon hangs 7 degrees below Venus, much closer to the horizon. On the evening of June 16, the lunar crescent stands 7 degrees to the left of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky becomes a deep, dark blue, about one hour after sunset.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 12:30 a.m. and culminates in the south at dawn. The Red Planet shines some 30 degrees to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. During the night of June 30 to July 1, the waning gibbous moon hangs a few degrees above the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the south-southeast horizon during evening twilight, culminates 28 degrees high in the south around 10:30 p.m., and vanishes in the west-southwest at the first light of dawn. The waxing gibbous Moon shines a few degrees to the upper left of Jupiter on the evening of June 23.

    Saturn emerges above the southeast horizon around 10 p.m., culminates around 2 a.m. about 22 degrees high in the south, and then vanishes at dawn as brightening daylight overwhelms it. Mars shines some 30 degrees to the left of Saturn, and the gap between the two planets widens with each passing day. During the night of June 27 to 28, the full moon hangs just one degree above the ringed planet.


    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From June 18 to July 2, 2018

    Mercury passed behind the sun (superior conjunction) on June 5, and gradually emerges in the evening sky during the second half of June. Scan the west-northwest horizon, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset, in search of the tiny planet; binoculars may help you locate it in the glow of twilight. Mercury is brighter at the beginning of this observing window, and becomes fainter with every passing day.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken in the minutes after sunset. Venus is gradually pulling away from the Sun and sets more than two hours after our daytime star. On the evening of July 15, the lunar crescent hangs 2 degrees to the right of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky darkens, about 45 minutes to one hour after sunset.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 11:30 p.m. and culminates in the south at dawn. The Red Planet begins its retrograde loop on June 28: until late August, it will move westward (toward the right) with respect to the background stars. During the night of June 30 to July 1, the waning gibbous moon hangs a few degrees above the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the southern horizon during evening twilight, about 29 degrees in elevation; it spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes after 2 a.m. The waxing gibbous Moon shines a few degrees to the upper left of Jupiter on the evening of June 23.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight above the southeast horizon, culminates around 1 a.m. about 22 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes at dawn. During the night of June 27 to 28, the full moon hangs just one degree above the ringed planet.


    0 0

    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From July 2 to 16, 2018

    Mercury is still visible in the evening sky, and will remain so until the third week of July. Search for the tiny planet 30 to 45 minutes after sunset, scanning the west-northwest horizon to the lower right of Venus. With each passing day Mercury is becoming fainter and more difficult to spot it in the glow of twilight; binoculars may help you locate it. On July 14 at dusk, the thin crescent moon hangs just 1 ½ degrees above the tiny planet: look for them with binoculars in the west-northwest, 30 minutes after sunset.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken in the minutes after sunset. Venus is still pulling away from the Sun and sets more than two hours after our daytime star. On the evening of July 15, the lunar crescent hangs 2 degrees to the right of Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky darkens, about 45 minutes to one hour after sunset.

    Mars emerges above the southeast horizon around 11:00 p.m. and culminates around 2:30 a.m., 21 degrees high in the south. The Red Planet is now (and for the next few weeks) brighter than Jupiter. Mars is presently performing its retrograde loop: until late August, it is moving westward (toward the right) with respect to the background stars. During the night of July 26 to 27 and 27 to 28, the full moon will shine near the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the south-southwest horizon during evening twilight and spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes after 1 a.m. The waxing gibbous Moon shines 3 ½ degrees above Jupiter on the evening of July 20.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight above the southeast horizon, culminates around midnight about 22 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes at dawn. During the night of July 24 to 25, the waxing gibbous moon approaches within one degree from the ringed planet.


older | 1 | (Page 2) | 3 | 4 | newer