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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From November 19 to December 3, 2018

    Mercury is presently too close to the sun and is not visible. The tiny planet passes between Earth and the sun (inferior conjunction) on November 27, after which it rapidly pulls away from the sun’s glare: it reappears in the dawn sky in December.

    Venus is the dazzling Morning Star visible at the end of the night and at dawn. It emerges above the east-southeast horizon about three hours before sunrise; at dawn, it stands about 25 degrees high in the southeast. On the morning of December 3, the thin waning crescent Moon hangs 5 degrees above Venus.

    Mars is receding from Earth since its opposition in late July. Although it is slowly fading, the Red Planet remains a conspicuously bright object: it appears in the south-southeast at dusk, culminates around 6:00 p.m. some 35 degrees high in the south, and sets in the west-southwest around 11:30 p.m. During the evening of December 14, the waxing crescent moon approaches within 4 degrees below the Red Planet.

    Jupiter is presently drowned in the glare of the sun and is not visible. The giant planet passes behind our star (conjunction) on November 26 and will reappear at dawn in December.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight about 12 degrees high in the southwest, and then gradually descends toward the horizon where it vanishes around 6:30 p.m. On December 8 and 9, at dusk, the thin crescent moon will hang near the ringed planet, very low on the horizon, 45 minutes after sunset.


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From December 3 to 17, 2018

    Mercury is visible low in the east-southeast at dawn, one hour before sunrise. The tiny planet will move away from the sun glare over the coming days, and its brightness will increase at the same time, making it easier to spot.On the morning of December 5, the thin waning crescent Moon hangs 3 degrees above Mercury.

    Venus is the dazzling Morning Star visible at the end of the night and at dawn. It emerges above the east-southeast horizon about 3 ½ hours before sunrise; at dawn, it stands more than 25 degrees high in the southeast. On the morning of December 3, the waning crescent Moon hangs 5 degrees above Venus.

    Mars is receding from Earth since its opposition in late July. The Red Planet is slowly fading, but remains conspicuously bright: it appears in the south-southeast at dusk, culminates shortly before 6:00 p.m. some 35 degrees high in the south, and sets in the west-southwest after 11:00 p.m. During the evening of December 14, the waxing crescent moon approaches within 4 degrees below the Red Planet.

    Jupiter gradually reappears at dawn after December 12. Look for the giant planet very low in the southeast, a few degrees below Mercury, about 40 minutes before sunrise. Jupiter is pulling away from the sun’s glare and becomes easier to see with each passing day.

    Saturn is sinking in the glare of sunset. The ringed planet appears during evening twilight less than 10 degrees high in the southwest, and sets about an hour later. On December 8 and 9, at dusk, the thin crescent moon appears near Saturn, very low on the horizon, 45 minutes after sunset.


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From December 17 to 31, 2018

    Mercury is visible in the east-southeast at dawn, between 45 minutes and one hour before sunrise. As Jupiter moves away from the sun’s glare and emerges above the horizon, it crosses paths with Mercury: On the morning of December 21, the two planets shine less than one degree apart.

    Venus is the dazzling Morning Star visible at the end of the night and at dawn. It emerges above the east-southeast horizon about 3 ½ hours before sunrise; at dawn, it stands more than 25 degrees high in the south-southeast. On the morning of January 1, the waning crescent Moon shines 5 degrees to the upper right of Venus. The next morning, January 2, the thin lunar crescent hangs between Venus and Jupiter.

    Mars is receding from Earth since its opposition in late July. The Red Planet is fading, but remains conspicuously bright: it appears at dusk more than 40 degrees high in the south, and sets in the west after 11:00 p.m. During the evening of January 12, the waxing crescent moon approaches within 6 degrees of the Red Planet.

    Jupiter is now fairly easy to spot at dawn: you’ll find it very low in the southeast, about 45 minutes before sunrise. As it pulls away from the sun’s glare and gains elevation at dawn, the Giant Planet becomes easier to see. It also crosses Mercury’s path: On the morning of December 21, the two planets shine less than one degree apart. On the morning of January 3, the waning crescent Moon hangs 3 degrees to the left of Jupiter.

    Saturn is now lost in the glare of the sun. The ringed planet passes behind the sun (conjunction) on January 2 and will reappear at dawn a few weeks later.


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    English

    Start date

    Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 10:00 AM

    ID Location

    ID space

    Location

    Summary

    APRIL 6 - Come take part in an open discussion with two enthusiastic scientists as they share their tales and striking images of their experiences north of the 55th parallel.

    Description

    With ethnobotanist Alain Cuerrier, a researcher at the Jardin botanique, and Maxim Larrivée, a researcher and head of entomological collections and research at the Insectarium. To conduct research north of the 55th parallel, you have to start by gaining the trust of the Inuit who call this land home and the Kativik regional government. Through his “Nunavik Sentinels” project, Maxim introduces young Inuit to research and studying insects, and in turn they use their extensive knowledge of the region to document its little-known insect life. At the same time, for close to twenty years now, the Inuit have been sharing their knowledge of ecology and their use of plants with him. This precious first-hand information lets him record and preserve their heritage, which has traditionally been passed down orally. Come take part in an open discussion with two enthusiastic scientists as they share their tales and striking images of their experiences in the field.  In French only.   TO ATTEND: Buy your ticket online / 35 spots available Show up in the Garden's Reception Centre 15 minutes before the activity with your ticket. Note: Ticket includes admission to the Jardin botanique on the same day.   This activity is part of the series Up Close with an Expert. One Saturday a month, come behind the scenes for an exceptional intimate chat with our scientists.

    Event ID

    853 788

    Type

    Thematics

    Up close

    End date

    Monday, December 17, 2018 - 11:31 AM

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  • 12/17/18--14:00: Up close with an Expert
  • English

    Start date

    Saturday, January 12, 2019 - 10:00 AM

    ID space

    Location

    Summary

    ONE SATURDAY EVERY MONTH - Come behind the scenes for an exceptional intimate chat with our scientists.

    Description

    An exceptional intimate chat with our scientists One Saturday a month, come behind the scenes for an exceptional intimate chat with our scientists. In french only.     One saturday every month, 10 a.m. to noon List of activities : January 12: Olivier Hernandez - Planet Hunter  February 2: Andrée Nault - Operation Save Mingan thistle March 2: Frédéric Pitre - Creating 'zero-waste' loops with research findings April 6: Maxim Larrivée and Alain Cuerrier - Research sets its sights on the North   Space is limitedBuy your tickets here

    Event ID

    848 512

    Type

    Thematics

    Up close

    End date

    Friday, April 5, 2019 - 8:00 PM

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    English

    Start date

    Saturday, March 2, 2019 - 10:00 AM

    ID Location

    ID space

    Location

    Summary

    MARCH 2 - Chat with our two researchers about these willows’ many “lives” and visit the labs where their experiments are based.

    Description

    With Frédéric Pitre, a researcher and botanist at the Jardin botanique de Montréal, and Eszter Sas, student researcher and PhD candidate at the Université de Montréal Institut de recherche en biologie végétale. At his research site in Saint-Roch-de-l’Achigan, Frédéric uses willows to treat wastewater. After three years of filtration work, healthy willows are removed and are ready for their second life. This is when Eszter takes over, since she is exploring possible uses for these plants once their remediation work is done. Chat with our two researchers about these willows’ many “lives” and visit the labs where their experiments are based.  In French only.   TO ATTEND: Buy your ticket online / 35 spots available Show up in the Garden's Reception Centre 15 minutes before the activity with your ticket. Note: Ticket includes admission to the Jardin botanique on the same day.   This activity is part of the series Up Close with an Expert. One Saturday a month, come behind the scenes for an exceptional intimate chat with our scientists.

    Event ID

    853 782

    Type

    Thematics

    Up close

    End date

    Monday, December 17, 2018 - 11:30 AM

    0 0

    English

    Start date

    Thursday, November 1, 2018 (All day)

    ID Location

    Summary

    Would you like to learn more about the Marie-Victorin Herbarium? Follow your guide!

    Description

    Follow your guide! Guided Tours of the Exhibition Greenhouses November 1 to May 14 : Tuesday to Sunday, at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.* May 15 to October 31: Every day, at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.*For a memorable visit to the Jardin botanique de Montréal, our volunteer guides will be happy to lead you on a trip around the world in our exhibition greenhouses. Thematic guided tours Marie-Victorin Herbarium Every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m., except December 26, 2018 and January 2, 2019. In French only.The Marie-Victorin Herbarium is a large collection. Thanks to its 634,640 specimens, the Herbarium is known internationally and ranks fourth largest among Canadian herbaria. It is used for research and education. From November 1, 2018 to May 14, 2019, leaving from the entrance to the Molson Greenhouse. From May 15 to October 31, 2019: Departures from the Friends of the Botanical Garden kiosk. Shrub Garden, Rose Garden and Alpine Garden Visits starting on May 15, 2019, every Wednesday and Saturday at 10:30 a.m.. Tours are offered free, with an admission ticket, in co-operation with the Friends of the Montréal Botanical Garden. Departures from the Friends of the Botanical Garden kiosk. * The general tours are offered in English according to the availability of English-speaking guides.        

    Event ID

    790 050

    Thematics

    June, July, August: Glorious NATURE

    End date

    Wednesday, October 30, 2019 - 8:00 PM

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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From December 31, 2018, to January 14, 2019

    Mercury is visible in the east-southeast at dawn, 30 minutes before sunrise. The tiny planet is sinking back toward the sun, and it appears lower on the horizon with each passing day: it becomes lost in the glow of approaching daylight during the second week of January. Mercury passes behind the sun (superior conjunction) on January 30, and will reappear in the evening sky during the second week of February. On the morning of January 4, the waning crescent Moon shines less than 3 degrees above Mercury.

    Venus is the dazzling Morning Star visible at the end of the night and at dawn. It emerges above the east-southeast horizon 3 ½ hours before sunrise; at dawn, it stands about 25 degrees high in the south-southeast. On the morning of January 1, the waning crescent Moon shines 5 degrees to the upper right of Venus. The next morning, January 2, the thin lunar crescent hangs between Venus and Jupiter.

    Mars is receding from Earth since its opposition in late July. The Red Planet is fading, but remains conspicuously bright: it appears at dusk about 45 degrees high in the south, and sets in the west after 11:00 p.m. During the evening of January 12, the waxing crescent moon approaches within 6 degrees of the Red Planet.

    Jupiter is now an easy target at dawn: the very bright Giant Planet emerges in the southeast about 1 ½ hours before sunrise, to the lower left of even brighter Venus. Jupiter pulls away from the sun day by day, gains elevation at dawn, and climbs toward Venus: the two brightest planets come within 2 ½ degrees of each other on the morning of January 22.On the morning of January 3, the waning crescent Moon hangs 3 degrees to the left of Jupiter.

    Saturn is too close to the sun and is not visible. The ringed planet passes behind the sun (conjunction) on January 2 and will reappear at dawn a few weeks later.


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  • 01/07/19--09:00: Night Sky
  • English

    Start date

    Tuesday, January 8, 2019 (All day)

    Summary

    STARTING ON JANUARY 8 - Beneath the 360° dome at the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan, Come discover the treasures and mysteries of the starry sky.

    Description

    A presentation on tonight’s sky Come discover the treasures and mysteries of the starry sky. Beneath the 360° dome at the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan, you’ll enjoy an immersive experience whisking you through time and space. Stars, planets, the Moon, constellations, legends and the latest astronomy news… there’s plenty to surprise and amaze you. Producer: Espace pour la vie Schedule

    Event ID

    853 791

    Topic

    Type

    End date

    Wednesday, May 8, 2019 - 8:00 PM

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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From January 14 to 28, 2019

    Mercury is too close to the sun and is not visible presently. The tiny planet passes behind the sun (superior conjunction) on January 30, and will reappear in the evening sky during the second week of February.

    Venus is the dazzling Morning Star that dominates the southeastern sky at the end of the night and at dawn. It emerges above the east-southeast horizon 3 hours before sunrise; at dawn, it stands about 20 degrees high in the south-southeast. Not quite as brilliant, Jupiter also shines in the same area of the sky: in fact, the two brightest planets lie within 3 degrees of each other from January 21 to 24, and they’re separated by less than 2 ½ degrees on the morning of January 22.On the morning of January 31, the thin lunar crescent lies between Jupiter and Venus, just 2 ½ degrees to the right of the Morning Star. The next morning, February 1, the thin lunar crescent hangs between Venus and Saturn.

    Mars is still receding from Earth and slowly fading. But the Red Planet remains an easily identifiable object: it appears at dusk about 50 degrees high in the south-southwest, and sets in the west after 11:00 p.m. On the evening of February 10, the waxing crescent moon lays degrees to the left of the Red Planet.

    Jupiter is now easy to see in the southeast at the end of the night and at dawn, near dazzling Venus. In fact, the two brightest planets lie within 3 degrees of each other from January 21 to 24, and they’re separated by less than 2 ½ degrees on the morning of January 22.On the morning of January 30, the waning crescent Moon hangs 7 degrees to the upper right of Jupiter. The next morning, January 31, the thin lunar crescent lies between Jupiter and Venus.

    Saturn passed behind the sun (conjunction) on January 2. The ringed planet will reappear at dawn during the last week of January: scan the southeast horizon with binoculars between 45 minutes and one hour before sunrise looking for a pinpoint of light in the colours of dawn.