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  • 07/09/18--13:00: Cosmic Collisions / EXO
  • English

    Start date

    Tuesday, April 17, 2018 (All day)

    Summary

    UNTIL APRIL 14, 2019 - A new double feature at the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium.

    Description

    Double feature for 7 years old and over Cosmic Collisions A radical change from our peaceful night sky, Cosmic Collisions presents the spectacular result of gravity pulling together planets, stars, and galaxies. These sometimes explosive encounters may have not only ended the age of the dinosaurs and gave birth to new stars,essential for life on Earth. Cosmic Collisions will provide an extraordinary view of the forces – constructive or catastrophic – that continue to shape our Universe. Producer: American Museum of Natural History (United States), in collaboration with the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, GOTO Inc. and the Shanghai Science and Technology Museum. Length: 23 minutes Schedule   EXO Are we alone in the Universe? As thousands of planets are being detected outside our solar system, can the discovery of life elsewhere be far off? Scientists are delving into this quest for knowledge of our origins, and the possible impact of finding extraterrestrial life. The show is preceded by a presentation on tonight’s sky. Produced by Montréal Space for Life  Director: Sébastien Gauthier Length: 40 minutes Schedule Fact sheet Are we alone? Contest

    Event ID

    807 890

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    Nature dwells within us

    End date

    Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 8:00 PM

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    English

    Start date

    Sunday, July 1, 2018 - 2:00 PM

    ID Location

    Summary

    SUNDAYS FROM JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 2 - Music is in the spotlight in the heart of the Botanical Garden. Take a comfortable seat, relax and let our guest artists serenade you in a restful summertime setting.

    Description

    Guest artists at the Botanical Garden every Sunday Music is in our nature Come listen to tunes by your favourite artists every Sunday afternoon this summer in the heart of the garden. Enjoy the outdoor concert series in a fragrant summertime setting. Stretch out near the stage on the grass or in one of the chairs and absorb the music and nature. Complete programming July 1 - Ala.Ni July 8 - Sylvie Paquette July 15 - Moran July 22 - Pomme July 29 - Les Hay Babies August 5 - Laurence Jalbert August 12 - Marie Denise Pelletier August 19 - Émile Bilodeau August 26 - Bïa September 2 - Pierre Flynn

    Event ID

    808 377

    Topic

    Thematics

    June, July, August: Glorious NATURE

    End date

    Saturday, September 1, 2018 - 8:00 PM

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  • 07/04/18--08:00: Continuum / aurōrae
  • English

    Start date

    Tuesday, May 1, 2018 (All day)

    Summary

    UNTIL APRIL 15, 2019 - A new double feature at the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium.

    Description

    To celebrate its 5th anniversary, the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan will be presenting a real first: a double bill featuring the two multimedia shows that have been visitor favourites since it opened in 2013: Continuum and aurōrae. Continuum From the infinitely small to the infinitely large, a cosmic poem on the connection between humankind and the Universe. A breathtaking show designed by a pair of internationally acclaimed Montréal artists, Michel Lemieux and Victor Pilon, set to the entrancing symphonic music of Philip Glass. Producer: Neurone 3 and Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan (Canada) Length: 23 minutes Schedule   aurōrae Producer: Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium, Canada From Montréal to Yellowknife, from outer space to the Earth’s core, aurōrae explains and transcends the wonderfully inspiring and electrifying aurora borealis, the Northern Lights. Guided by an enthusiastic expert, come delight in an exceptional immersive experience beneath the spectacular dome at the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium. Celebrate light under one of nature’s most breathtaking spectacles, set to an energizing beat by DJ Champion. The show is preceded by a presentation on tonight’s sky. Directors: Philippe Baylaucq and Sébastien Gauthier Length: 40 minutes Schedule

    Event ID

    808 727

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    Nature dwells within us

    End date

    Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 8:00 PM

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    • Jardin botanique
    Picea glauca
    Photo: Roger Aziz, photographer

    The Jardin botanique is delighted to announce that it has received a gift of three remarkable specimens of North American bonsai and a magnificent penjing. These miniature trees, fashioned with love by their generous donor, David Johnson, perfectly exemplify both the beauties of this timeless art and the expertise developed by their owner.

    30 years of passion… and generosity!

    David Johnson has a vast collection of bonsai and penjing, some of which have already been displayed at the National Bonsai Exhibition in Rochester, New York. He is a past President of the Toronto Bonsai Society and has given workshops, written many articles and organized tours of collections over the years. He has long been connected with the Jardin botanique de Montréal and with a wide network of artists and amateurs who share his enthusiasm.

    A gift to be admired

    Two of the North American bonsai donated by Mr. Johnson are already on display in the #bonsai courtyard of the Frédéric Back Tree Pavilion:

    • cascading Thai occidentalis– about 205 years old
    • Picea sp. – Picea glauca – 105 years old

    Two others will be added to the garden’s North American bonsai collection: a Pinus strobus (about 100 years old) and a Betula nana penjing (about 25 years old).

    You can watch a report on Mr. Johnson’s work on Global News


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From July 16 to 30, 2018

    Mercury, now fainter and fainter, vanishes in the glow of sunset during the third week of July. The tiny planet passes between Earth and the sun (inferior conjunction) on August 8 and gradually reappears at dawn a couple of weeks later.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken in the minutes after sunset. Venus is still pulling away from the Sun, but its orbit is tilting down on the horizon: as a consequence, Venus now sets less than two hours after our daytime star. At dusk on August 14, the lunar crescent hangs 6 degrees above Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky darkens, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset.

    Mars is at opposition on July 27, which means it’s closer to Earth, larger and brighter than at any time in the past 15 years; for a few weeks, it even outshines bright Jupiter. Mars emerges above the southeast horizon at dusk, culminates around 1:30 a.m., barely 19 degrees high in the south, and vanishes in the southwest at dawn. Mars is presently performing its retrograde loop: until late August, it is moving westward (toward the right) with respect to the background stars. During the night of July 26 to 27 and 27 to 28, the full moon will shine near the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the south-southwest horizon during evening twilight and spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes after midnight. The waxing gibbous Moon shines 3 ½ degrees above Jupiter on the evening of July 20.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight above the south-southeast horizon, culminates around 11 p.m. about 22 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes after 3 a.m. During the night of July 24 to 25, the waxing gibbous moon approaches within one degree from the ringed planet.


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    English

    Start date

    Friday, October 5, 2018 - 10:00 AM

    ID Location

    Summary

    FROM OCTOBER 5 TO OCTOBER 31 - A fun and interactive story about a baby witch and a baby pumpkin! You're sure to have a great time in Monsterland.

    Description

    Baby witches in Monsterland are lucky. They not only get bottles of toad spit, but take their baths in snake eye juice. YUCK! And what about baby squash? Are they like baby witches? Do they have warts? Come learn how baby witches and baby pumpkins are different and alike, in our all-new storytelling session. Text by Lucie Papineau, illustrations by Steve Beshwaty, directed by Jean-François Guilbault. IN FRENCH ONLY Offered in co-operation with the Friends of the Montréal Botanical. Garden Length: 30 minutes Limited places, please purchase a pass at the reception desk. Reservation required.

    Event ID

    828 597

    Topic

    Type

    End date

    Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 8:00 PM

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    • Space for Life
    Drone carrying the hyperspectral camera used to map plant biodiversity.
    Photo: Pablo Arroyo

    Five Canadian researchers, including Associate Professor Étienne Laliberté from the Institut de recherche en biologie végétale (IRBV), an Espace pour la vie partner located on the grounds of the Jardin botanique, will be studying changes in plant biodiversity across Canada as part of a very special project by the Canadian Airborne Biodiversity Observatory (CABO), using emerging spectranomics technology.

    The data collected will make it possible to monitor the distribution of invasive species, changes in land use and the composition of plant communities. This revolutionary approach, led by the

    Université de Montréal, will change the way plant biodiversity data are collected in Canada and around the world!

    Spectranomics has enormous potential, since it uses hyperspectral sensors mounted on aircraft or unmanned drones that give researchers access to inaccessible, remote regions with a wealth of different species. Its high-resolution images are nearly as detailed as ground-based inventories, but cover much larger areas.

    A timely $4 million grant

    The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada has awarded funding of $1 million per year over four years to support this innovative collaborative research project. This generous assistance will help Canada position itself as a world leader in biodiversity and conservation science!


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From July 30 to August 13, 2018

    In August, four planets are visible at twilight between the west and southeast. Appearing from right to left are Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. The Moon is also part of the scene from the 13th to 23rd; on August 14, the crescent Moon hangs a few degrees above Venus. Catch all five in a single viewing about 40 minutes after sunset in the colourful twilight sky; Venus is the first to sink below the horizon soon thereafter.

    Mercury is presently too close to the Sun and is not observable. The tiny planet passes between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on August 8 and gradually reappears at dawn a couple of weeks later.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces through the colours of twilight in the west, as soon as the sky begins to darken minutes after sunset. Venus is still pulling away from the Sun, but its orbit is tilting down on the horizon: as a consequence, Venus now sets less than two hours after our daytime star. At dusk on August 14, the lunar crescent hangs 6 degrees above Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky darkens, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset.

    Mars was at opposition on July 27, which means it’s presently closer to Earth, larger and brighter than at any time in the past 15 years; for a few weeks, it even outshines bright Jupiter. Mars appears low in the southeast at dusk, culminates just after midnight barely 18 degrees high in the south, and vanishes in the southwest at dawn. Mars is presently performing its retrograde loop: until late August, it is moving westward (toward the right) with respect to the background stars. During the night of August 22 to 23 and 23 to 24, the waxing gibbous moon will shine near the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the southwest horizon during evening twilight and spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes before midnight. The waxing Moon will appear near Jupiter on the evenings of August 16 and 17.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight above the south-southeast horizon, culminates around 10 p.m. about 22 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes after 1 a.m. During the night of August 20 to 21, the waxing gibbous moon shines a few degrees to the right of the ringed planet.


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  • 07/31/18--13:00: Up close with an Expert
  • English

    Start date

    Saturday, October 6, 2018 - 10:00 AM

    ID Location

    Summary

    FIRST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH - Come behind the scenes for an exceptional intimate chat with our scientists.

    Description

    An exceptional intimate chat with our scientists On the first Saturday of every month, join an expert and head behind the scenes for a peek into the daily lives of actual scientists whose enthusiasm is contagious! Come share in their dedication to helping protect our living world. First Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. to noon    September 8 : Christelle Roy-Corbin - Acupuncture as a tool for treating the animals. October 6: Alizée Girard and Rosalie Beauchamp-Rioux - Biodiversity seen from the sky. November 3: André Grandchamps and Gaétant Cormier - Meteorite hunters. December 1: Stéphane Le Tirant - A new discovery era for insects By reservation            

    Event ID

    815 367

    Type

    Thematics

    Up close

    End date

    Friday, November 30, 2018 - 7:00 PM

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  • 08/08/18--09:00: Meteorite hunters
  • English

    Start date

    Saturday, November 3, 2018 - 10:00 AM

    Summary

    NOVEMBER 3 - Learn about meteorite hunters, dealers and curators, as these experts share the unusual stories of these extraterrestrial objects.

    Description

    With André Grandchamps, astronomer and curator of the meteorite collection at the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan and Gaétan Cormier, meteorite dealer and amateur astronomer from the Maison de l’Astronomie Get a peek into a little-known world and learn about meteorite hunters, dealers and curators, as these experts share the unusual stories of these extraterrestrial objects. Visit some places normally off limits to the public, including the laboratory and the collection, and become a curator for a few minutes as you polish a meteorite fragment. In French only.   TO ATTEND: Secure your place on Eventbrite / Space is limited Buy your ticket online and select Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium - General Admission (no date) Show up in the Planetarium’s Reception Hall 15 minutes before the activity with your ticket. Note: Ticket includes admission to a double program of shows of your choice in the afternoon on November 3.   This activity is part of the series Up Close with an Expert. One Saturday a month, come behind the scenes for an exceptional intimate chat with our scientists.  

    Event ID

    830 333

    Type

    Thematics

    Up close

    End date

    Wednesday, August 8, 2018 - 10:59 AM

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    English

    Start date

    Saturday, December 1, 2018 - 10:00 AM

    ID Location

    ID space

    Location

    Summary

    DECEMBER 1 - Take this opportunity to meet a researcher and exceptional storyteller and get a close-up look at his latest finds.

    Description

    With Stéphane Le Tirant, researcher and curator of the scientific collection at the Insectarium Drawing on his thousands of international contacts, Stéphane collaborates with insect experts and enthusiasts around the world to add to the Insectarium’s scientific collection and to discover new species. And he does it all without having to organize complex and costly collection missions to other lands. How does he discover new species? What surprises has he encountered along the way? Take this opportunity to meet a researcher and exceptional storyteller and get a close-up look at his latest finds. In French only.   TO ATTEND: Secure your place on Eventbrite / Space is limited Buy your ticket online and select Botanical Garden and Insectarium - General Admission Show up in the Garden's Reception Centre 15 minutes before the activity with your ticket. Note: Ticket includes admission to the Jardin botanique on the same day.   This activity is part of the series Up Close with an Expert. One Saturday a month, come behind the scenes for an exceptional intimate chat with our scientists.

    Event ID

    830 334

    Type

    Thematics

    Up close

    End date

    Wednesday, August 8, 2018 - 10:59 AM

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  • 08/09/18--12:00: Gardens of Light
  • English

    Start date

    Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:00 AM

    ID Location

    Summary

    FROM SEPTEMBER 7 TO OCTOBER 31 - A fall event that will light up the three Jardin botanique cultural gardens in grand style. New for 2018 – Fixed-time tickets required.

    Description

    New for 2018 – Timed-fixed tickets required Important information for the 2018 Gardens of Light visit Natural HarmonyThis autumn event sets three cultural gardens at the Jardin botanique all aglow. The Chinese Garden displays its traditional lanterns and shares a fabulous fishing tale with visitors, the Japanese Garden leads visitors along a meditative illuminated path inspired by the seasons, and the First Nations Garden features an intense multimedia experience that lets visitors feel the beating heart of the Cycle of Life.   Information for the 2018 Gardens of Light visit Buy your fixed-time tickets ahead of time online. Your visit will take place rain or shine; try to pick clothes that suit the weather. No exchange or refund. Allow enough time to get to the lion statue at the entrance to the Rose Garden, the departure point, at the time indicated on your ticket. No admission to the Gardens of Light pathway before or after the indicated time. Consider public transit (Métro Pie-IX; buses 185 and 139). Parking spots are not guaranteed. The parking lots can fill up quickly on the busiest evenings. Major additional parking available on Friday and Saturday evenings as well as on Sunday, October 7 at Olympic Park P4, 4200 Sherbrooke East. Choose a baby carrier over a stroller, if possible, to make getting around the site easier. Camera tripods as well as drones are prohibited at the Jardin botanique de Montréal.   For further information, don’t hesitate to consult our FAQ section.

    Event ID

    809 537

    Topic

    Type

    Thematics

    Gardens of Light

    End date

    Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 8:00 PM

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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From August 13 to 27, 2018

    In August, four planets are visible at twilight between the west and southeast. Appearing from right to left are Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. The Moon is also part of the scene from the 13th to 23rd; on August 14, the crescent Moon hangs a few degrees above Venus. Catch all five in a single viewing about 40 minutes after sunset in the colourful twilight sky; Venus is the first to sink below the horizon soon thereafter.

    Mercury passed between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on August 8 and gradually reappears after August 20. Look for the tiny planet low in the east-northeast, 45 minutes before sunrise. Mercury becomes much brighter — and easier to see — in the last days of August and during the first week of September.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces through the colours of twilight in the west-southwest, as soon as the sky begins to darken minutes after sunset. Venus is presently at greatest elongation from the Sun, but the inclination of its orbit keeps the planet close to the horizon during evening twilight: as a consequence, Venus now sets less than 1 ½ hours after our daytime star. At dusk on August 14, the lunar crescent hangs 6 degrees above Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky darkens, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset.

    Mars was at opposition on July 27, and it’s presently closer to Earth, larger and brighter than at any time in the past 15 years; for a few more weeks, it even outshines bright Jupiter. Mars appears low in the southeast at dusk, culminates around 11 p.m. barely 18 degrees high in the south, and sets in the southwest around 3 a.m. Mars is presently performing its retrograde loop: until late August, it is moving westward (toward the right) with respect to the background stars. During the night of August 22 to 23 and 23 to 24, the waxing gibbous moon will shine near the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the southwest horizon during evening twilight and spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes before 11 p.m. The waxing Moon will appear near Jupiter on the evenings of August 16 and 17.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight about 22 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes around 1 a.m. During the night of August 20 to 21, the waxing gibbous moon shines a few degrees to the right of the ringed planet.


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From August 27 to September 10, 2018

    In September, four planets are visible at twilight between the southwest and southeast. Appearing from right to left are Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. The Moon is also part of the scene from the 12th to 19th. Catch all of them in a single viewing during early twilight, about 20 to 40 minutes after sunset. But don’t wait: Venus is already very low on the horizon and the first to set.

    Mercury is very bright at the moment and is visible at dawn until around September 10. In late August and early September, look for the tiny planet low in the east-northeast, 45 to 60 minutes before sunrise. But Mercury’s elongation from the Sun is decreasing rapidly, and during the second week of September, the tiny planet is only visible against a much brighter sky, 20 to 30 minutes before sunrise. On the morning of September 8, the thin crescent moon hangs 6 degrees above Mercury.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces through the colours of twilight in the west-southwest, as soon as the sky begins to darken minutes after sunset. Presently, Venus is nearly at greatest elongation from the Sun, but the inclination of its orbit keeps the planet very close to the horizon during evening twilight: as a consequence, Venus now sets less than 75 minutes after our daytime star. At dusk on September 12, the lunar crescent hangs 9 degrees above Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky darkens, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset.

    Mars was at opposition on July 27. The Red Planet is now receding from Earth, but it remains closer to us and appears larger and brighter than during any other opposition since 2003; at the moment, it even outshines bright Jupiter! Mars appears low in the southeast at dusk, culminates around 10 p.m. barely 18 degrees high in the south, and sets in the southwest around 2 a.m. Mars ends its retrograde loop on August 28, and returns to its direct motion, now moving eastward (toward the left) with respect to the background stars. During the night of September 19 to 20, the waxing gibbous moon will shine 4 degrees above the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears above the southwest horizon during evening twilight and spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes before 10 p.m. On the evening of September 13, the waxing crescent Moon will hang about 4 degrees from Jupiter.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight about 22 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes around midnight. On the evening of September 17, the waxing gibbous moon shines 4 degrees to the left of the ringed planet.


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From September 10 to 24, 2018

    In September, four planets are visible at twilight between the west-southwest and south-southeast. Appearing from right to left are Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. The Moon is also part of the scene from the 12th to 19th. Catch all of them in a single viewing during early twilight, about 20 to 40 minutes after sunset. But don’t wait: Venus is already very low on the horizon and the first to set.

    Mercury is now too close to the Sun and is not visible. The tiny planet passes behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on September 20; it will emerge in October for what will be a very poor evening apparition for Northern Hemisphere observers.

    Venus is the bright Evening Star that pierces through the colours of twilight, very low in the west-southwest as soon as the sky begins to darken after sunset. The angle between Venus and the Sun is now decreasing, and the inclination of its orbit keeps the planet very close to the horizon during evening twilight: as a consequence, Venus now sets less than an hour after our daytime star. Venus will completely vanish in the Sun’s glare by the end of the month. At dusk on September 12, the lunar crescent hangs 9 degrees above Venus: with binoculars, admire the earthshine that dimly lights the otherwise dark section of the lunar disc. The scene becomes truly magnificent when the sky darkens, 30 to 45 minutes after sunset.

    Mars was at opposition on July 27. The Red Planet is now receding from Earth and slowly fading, but it remains a conspicuously bright object that appears low in the southeast at dusk, culminates around 9:30 p.m. barely 20 degrees high in the south, and sets in the southwest around 1:30 a.m. During the night of September 19 to 20, the waxing gibbous moon will shine 4 degrees above the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears during evening twilight about 15 degrees above the southwest horizon and spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes before 9 p.m. On the evening of September 13, the waxing crescent Moon will hang about 4 degrees from Jupiter.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight about 22 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes around 11 p.m. On the evening of September 17, the waxing gibbous moon shines 4 degrees to the left of the ringed planet.


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    • Space for Life, Insectarium, Jardin botanique
    The Blitz results at a glance!
    Photo: Space for Life (Claude Lafond)

    Between July 28 and August 5, everyone in Canada, the United States and Mexico was invited to take part in an International Monarch Monitoring Blitz to collect data on monarch butterflies. And what is really great is that the results are already available online, with an interactive map showing the exact location of monarch reproduction sites in the three countries, at a glance.

    All in all, 486 people took part in the Blitz in 7 Canadian provinces, 16 Mexican states and 36 US states. A total of 53,588 milkweed plants were examined and 13,831 monarchs sighted. And we’re pleased to note that Canadians made a huge contribution. You can see the results in your region by clicking on the orange dots on the map.

    This international Blitz is part of the Mission Monarch research project, which aims to save monarch butterflies with the help of the public. The data gathered will be used to give scientists a snapshot of the status of monarch populations all along their migratory corridor.

    And even though the Blitz is over, Mission Monarch still needs your help! You can continue contributing data until mid-September, when the last monarchs usually leave the region for their long journey to Mexico.

    For detailed results, see the press release from the Commission for Environmental Cooperation.

    Mission Monarch:  http://espacepourlavie.ca/en/mission-monarch


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From September 24 to October 8, 2018

    Mercury is now too close to the Sun and is not visible. The tiny planet passed behind the Sun (superior conjunction) on September 20; it will begin in mid-October a very poor evening apparition for Northern Hemisphere observers.

    Venus is visible with much difficulty in the glow of sunset, very low in the west-southwest 15 minutes after sunset. The bright planet will completely vanish in the Sun’s glare by the end of September. Venus passes between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on October 26 and will emerge in the dawn sky in early November.

    Mars is receding from Earth since its opposition in late July. The Red Planet is also slowly fading, but it remains a conspicuously bright object: it appears low in the south-southeast at dusk, culminates around 9:00 p.m. some 22 degrees high in the south, and sets in the southwest around 1:00 a.m. During the evenings of October 17 and 18, the waxing gibbous moon will shine near the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears during evening twilight about 12 degrees above the southwest horizon and spends the rest of the evening slowly descending toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes around 8 p.m. On the evening of October 11, the waxing crescent Moon will hang 3 degrees above Jupiter.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight about 20 degrees high in the south, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes before 10 p.m. On the evening of October 14, the waxing gibbous moon shines 2 degrees to the right of the ringed planet.


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    • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
    Photo: Sophie Desrosiers

    From October 8 to 22, 2018

    Mercury begins after mid-October a very poor evening apparition for Northern Hemisphere observers. The tiny planet is visible with great difficulty very low in the west-southwest, 15 minutes after sunset. A perfectly clear horizon and the use of binoculars will be key to success in spotting Mercury in the lingering glow of sunset.

    Venus is too close to the horizon at sunset and is not visible at the moment. Venus passes between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on October 26 and will emerge in the dawn sky in early November.

    Mars is receding from Earth since its opposition in late July. The Red Planet is also slowly fading, but it remains a conspicuously bright object: it appears low in the south-southeast at dusk, culminates around 8:00 p.m. some 24 degrees high in the south, and sets in the southwest around 12:30 a.m. During the evenings of October 17 and 18, the waxing gibbous moon will shine near the Red Planet.

    Jupiter appears during evening twilight less than 10 degrees above the southwest horizon and slowly descends toward the west-southwest horizon where it vanishes around 7 p.m. On the evening of October 11, the waxing crescent Moon will hang 3 degrees above Jupiter.

    Saturn appears during evening twilight less than 20 degrees high in the south-southwest, and then gradually descends toward the southwest horizon where it vanishes after 9 p.m. On the evening of October 14, the waxing gibbous moon shines 2 degrees to the right of the ringed planet.


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  • 10/10/18--10:24: Jardin Zotik

    Year

    2018

    Type of garden

    Biodiversity Garden

    Bird Garden

    Edible garden

    Testimonial

    Quand nous avons emménagé dans notre duplex il y a un peu plus de trois ans, il n'y avait pratiquement pas de végétaux sur le parterre avant, assez vaste mais plein de roches. Nous avons décidé d'y remédier. Plusieurs coups de pelle et un voyage de terre plus tard, nous avons planté nos premières fleurs : iris, hostas et plusieurs variétés d'hémérocalles données par des membres de la famille. Quelques fines herbes aussi. Nous avons ensuite planté un cerisier et un lilas, nos premiers arbres, puis quelques hydrangées et deux ou trois rosiers. Dès la première année, nous avons installé un bain d'oiseaux et créé un espace potager pour y planter tomates, cerises de terre, aubergines et autres fruits et légumes. Les deux années suivantes, nous avons agrandi le jardin et y avons ajouté différentes plantes pour attirer les pollinisateurs, qui s'en donnent à coeur joie. Cette année, nous avons ajouté une rangée de cosmos qui plaît aux chardonnerets. Le jardin est donc en fleurs de mai à septembre! C'est un projet en constante évolution, et il continuera certainement d'évoluer dans les années à venir.

    Garden location

    Montréal

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    • Space for Life, Insectarium, Jardin botanique
    Mission monarch: more money, more activities, more results!
    Photo: Insectarium de Montréal (K. Vendette)

    You’re familiar with the Mission Monarch project? Well, thanks to a $25,000 grant from Environment and Climate Change Canada awarded following an application by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority for the project Nation Monarch, there will be more chances to take part in this citizen-based research project directed by the Space for Life Insectarium.

    A grant that comes at just the right time

    In a participatory project like this, what’s especially key is to have the means to raise awareness and provide training not just for the general public but also for the staffs of organizations devoted to the environment, to biodiversity and to nature. The goal? Getting them involved so that they in turn can share information about Mission Monarch with their members and encourage them to participate in a project dedicated to safeguarding the monarch butterfly. For the time being this grant will make it possible for us to increase our educational activities (training, information booths, field activities, etc.) in Québec and in Ontario. We’re working hard on extending our network to the Prairies.

    All details on Mission Monarch: http://espacepourlavie.ca/en/mission-monarch


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